Monday, November 17, 2008

I wish the rest of the United States could feel how painful it is in Detroit right now. Maybe all of those people who don't feel like helping the US car companies out would understand how serious things are for the people around here. Most people think negatively about the UAW and how much workers get paid and blah-bitty-blah-blah. What most don't know it that it's more than just workers. It's the roofers, carpenters, painters, masons, ironworkers, and the glazers who depend on work from the auto industry. It's the restaurants, bar owners, and the ma & pop shops that depend on the business from the workers and contractors around the plants. It's the land developers and commercial and residential realtors who depend on the people to buy and sell property around the state. All of those people lose when those plants close. The only time I've ever seen a plant out of production, since I was 18 years old (and that's not SO long ago either), was during the summer 2 week shut down. Plants are shut down nightly now. nightly. it's like seeing retailers close their doors at 4pm on Black Friday. It's a huge shock to the system. It's almost devastating to see rows and rows of permanently empty cubes. It's something that lets us all know that this is serious.

2 comments:

Lindsay Collins said...

I hear ya. I am so terrified by the economy right now, and this whole "to bail out Detroit, to not bail out Detroit" debate, I obsess over our bank accounts, every penny we spend, and not getting fired from my job, because I don't even know where I'd begin to look for another one. STRESSFUL!

Jack said...

Exactly! I feel like I'm constantly living in fear of losing my job....and I don't work for the big three or their suppliers!

In this industry, I've seen the prices for our work plummet. We are seeing our little union roofing market shrink to the point where people are cheating just to be able to compete! It's so f-in hard to do your job with that kind of pressure hanging over your head. Makes you want to move south, set up a tent, and live in the woods for a while.